Rates.

Here are our rates and packages for payment at time of service, effective October 15th, 2015. For payment using health insurance or claims, please see other forms of payment.

We value your time and ask that you do the same for us: Barring emergencies or illness, appointments cancelled with less than 48 hours notice will incur a $75 late cancellation charge.

Standard massage.

A traditional massage incorporating Swedish, deep tissue, and myofascial release techniques.

*Add massage cupping to any session using the Medi-Cupping device to enhance the results of your session with Rochelle for just $20 more.

Price Session length Notes
$95 60 minutes
$52 30 minutes
$70 45 minutes
$137 90 minutes
Insurance Session lengths vary Out of pocket costs vary from plan to plan; billed $30 per 15 minutes (CPT code 97124 or 97140)
Kickstarter package – four session special Please check in with your therapist at your first session for details on this special offer. (Our therapists offer different special offers.)

 

$855 Buy nine 60-minute sessions
Get the tenth FREE
$1233 Buy nine 90-minute sessions
Get the tenth FREE

Cranio-sacral massage.

A gentle form of bodywork which works with flow of the cerebral spinal fluid and the bones of the skull and spine.

Price Session length Notes
$95 60 minutes
$137 90 minutes

Manual Lymphatic Drainage therapy.

A gentle stimulation of the lymph nodes and lymph vessels to increase the rate of lymph flow.

*Add massage cupping using the Medi-Cupping device to enhance the results of your session with Rochelle for just $20 more.

Price Session length Notes
$60 30 minutes
$105 60 minutes
$150 90 minutes

Raindrop massage technique.

A relaxing massage technique involving essential oils scattered like raindrops above the spine and applied to the vita flex points on the feet.

Price Session length Notes
$120 60 minutes
$160 90 minutes

* Rates effective October 15th, 2015.


Learn about other forms of payment:.

NOTE: You can use your flexible spending account for massage at Helix.


Health Insurance.

Having health insurance that covers massage can definitely make care more affordable and accessible. Here are some good things to know about working with your health insurance plan.

Treatment massage and insurance coverage

While we believe deeply in the value of massage therapy as part of an overall preventative and wellness plan, as we understand it, health insurance coverage for massage therapy is generally limited to addressing acute musculoskeletal issues (joint pain, muscle pain, back pain, neck pain, headaches, muscle strain/sprain, muscle spasms, etc) that are expected to improve with consistent care over a set period of time. With this in mind, we will be setting goals with you and documenting your progress; we will also ask you to commit to a consistent treatment plan. If scheduling proves to be too challenging, we may refer you on to another clinic to ensure that you receive the care you need in a timely fashion. Preventative care and care for relaxation/stress reduction is almost never covered, even if your doctor recommends the care for these reasons.

Am I covered?

Please note that coverage varies widely from plan to plan so we ask that you call your insurance company or talk to your company’s HR department in advance to verify coverage and learn the details. We recommend that you do so every year, as plan details are subject to change. You are ultimately responsible for the cost of your care, regardless of what happens with your insurance claim.

Jennifer Cea submits claims for clients as an in-network and out-of-network practitioner for many plans (see below for a list of plans). Rochelle Clark, Danielle Lowinger, and Megan (Jones) Miyazaki do not submit claims for insurance, but are happy to give you a receipt that you can submit to seek reimbursement.

Good questions to ask your insurance company or HR department:

  1. Is massage therapy covered with a licensed massage therapist? (Sometimes, it is only covered with a PT, DC or MD.) Is my massage therapist considered in-network with this plan? If not, do I have out of network coverage?
  2. Do I have a deductible (an amount of money that you pay out each year before your coverage kicks in)? If so, has it been met yet? Does it apply to massage therapy coverage? What is the allowed amount (this is the amount we agree to accept per the contract with your insurance company) per visit for CPT code 97124 or 97140 (four units = a 60 minute session)? This allowed amount is not the $95 rate we charge and accept for payment at the time.
  3. Is there a visit limit or monetary limit? And, do other forms of care count towards the visit limit? (Often, massage is part of a rehab benefit, which includes PT and other forms of care, or an alternative care benefit, with acupuncture and nutrition.)
  4. Do I have a copayment? Or coinsurance? How much is it?

 For sessions with an in-network practitioner, your practitioner will submit the claim and either collect your copayment or coinsurance at the time of service or bill you for any outstanding balance after the claim has processed.

* Effective 9/19/17, Megan (Jones) Miyazaki is no longer working with health insurance plans (i.e. submitting claims).

 

Jennifer is considered in-network with 

-Regence Blue Shield (PPO, Swedish/Providence, Real Value, Puget Sound High Value Network, UW Medicine Accountable Care Network) and many out of state Blue Shield plans.

-First Choice (not United plans affiliated with First Choice)

She works as an out of network provider with Premera Blue Cross, Regence plans not listed above, Aetna, Cigna and United.

*When working as an out of network practitioner, Jennifer will collect payment in full at the time of service and submit the claim for you so you may be reimbursed, per the coverage details of your plan.

 

 

Prescriptions

A prescription is required for any care covered by health insurance, even if your plan doesn’t explicitly require it, because nearly all coverage for massage is based on the documented medical necessity of the care. As massage therapists, we cannot diagnose conditions, and therefore, cannot confirm officially that your care is medically necessary in the eyes of an insurance plan.

A prescription from your doctor should include:

  • A start and end date (If your doctor recommended four visits once a week, the script expires four weeks from the start date.)
  • An ICD-10 diagnosis code for a musculoskeletal system problem or related issue
  • The number of visits recommended

NOTE: We will focus on the areas noted on the prescription.

Your doctor may fax your prescription to your therapist’s fax number (shown on the right sidebar at the top of this page) or mail it to 419 Queen Anne Ave. N., Suite 106, Seattle, WA 98109.


Injuries from Car Accidents.

Massage therapy can be a great resource for treating common injuries sustained in an automobile accident, such as whiplash, headaches, neck pain, fatigue, sleeplessness and back pain. If you’ve been injured, we’d love to help. To get the ball rolling…

See your doctor

First, see your doctor or chiropractor for an exam and assessment and to discuss your treatment options. If your doctor feels massage therapy could be helpful, ask for a prescription for massage.

Send us your claim information

Please send us the following as soon as possible via email or phone:

  • Name of the auto insurance company
  • Your claim number
  • Date of the accident
  • Name and phone number of the person managing your claim (sometimes called a claim adjustor)

Ideally, the insurance information you provide to us will be for a claim that you have opened with YOUR auto insurance company, regardless of who is at fault. This potentially enables your medical providers to be paid for your care as the costs accrue via the Personal Injury Protection (PIP) policy that is probably available on your insurance policy. (As we understand it, opening a claim with your insurer should not impact your premiums if you are not at fault.) Without PIP coverage, you may be able to use your health insurance or we can discuss other payment options.


Injuries at Work.

After an injury at work, your doctor may recommend massage therapy. We are affiliated with the Department of Labor and Industries and do bill them when there is an open claim. To get the ball rolling…

See your doctor

First, see your doctor or chiropractor for an exam and assessment, and let them know that the injury occurred at work. If your doctor feels massage therapy could be helpful, ask for a prescription for massage. (Your doctor may fax it to your therapist’s fax number, shown on the right sidebar at the top of this page.)

Stay in touch with your claims manager

Let your claims manager know that you are pursuing treatment.

Send us your claim information

Please send us the following as soon as possible via email or phone:

  • Your claim number
  • Date of the accident
  • Name and phone number of the person managing your claim (sometimes called a claim adjustor)

NOTE: In Washington, worker’s compensation laws pace your care in six session increments, and we need prior authorization from your claims manager as well as your doctor.